Restoring Pine Floor Boards Hunter

Pine in Hunter Homes

Pine, often called redwood, is cheaper and more plentiful than hardwoods, ranging from almost white to various shades of yellow to a deep, rich colour. For a softwood it’s often remarkably resilient and long-lasting, especially in the context of well looked after pine floors.

The vast pine plantations in the NSW area have contributed to a large number of Hunter homes being built with radiata pine flooring. As a result you may already have a floor that will be the envy of your friends under your existing floor coverings.

Those old pine boards that have acquired a patina through generations might be your favourite. There might be staining and dirt on it, it may be uneven and bent, and sometimes it might be rather black. For you, it’s perfect – a part of history that has lasted decades, if not centuries. And that’s fine. It might well last much longer without falling apart if it has lasted this long in one piece.

Alternatively, a new pine floor can appear pretty raw. A paler colour implies that it is newer and less settled in. If you want a more subtle, less overwhelming effect, you might want to use a wood dye. If you haven’t already protected the wood, you may want to add a quality finishing oil or varnish.

Changes in pine over time

One thing to consider is the colour. An old pine floor’s condition is another factor to consider. As boards age, they can cup or arch, curling up at the edges, which causes a thin sanded strip to appear down the middle of each board at the top, which widens with each successive pass as the boards are gradually levelled by sanding.

Old pine boards can appear extremely pale, even colourless, when you sand them back to their wood source. But don’t worry. The minute you apply a clear wood finishing product like an oil or varnish, that warm, attractive natural golden colour will come flooding through.

 

You Might Already Have Radiata Pine Floors…

Image if your dream flooring already existed under those old floor coverings, aged and ready to be refinished and stained. You could be the envy of your friends for a minimal investment.

Before finishing your floorboards, test the colour

Considering the dramatic change in colour, it’s best to test the finished product before choosing an oil or varnish. Luckily, it’s not hard. The process is straightforward. All you need to do is rub the surface with a damp cloth – not wet. The effects are exactly the same as oiling or varnishing. If you know what’s what, you can choose your finish: either something that enhances the natural colour or something colourless.

Is it possible to remove that bright orange/gold colour?

Orange and golden pine aren’t for everyone. You can get that effect with a standard clear oil or varnish – over time, it will turn a deeper orange/gold, and even an unpleasant brown. Your pine floor can be refinished by sanding off the old finish and replacing it with a product that will not change colour over time. 

Before finishing your floorboards, test the colour

Considering the dramatic change in colour, it’s best to test the finished product before choosing an oil or varnish. Luckily, it’s not hard. The process is straightforward. All you need to do is rub the surface with a damp cloth – not wet. The effects are exactly the same as oiling or varnishing. If you know what’s what, you can choose your finish: either something that enhances the natural colour or something colourless.

Is it possible to remove that bright orange/gold colour?

Orange and golden pine aren’t for everyone. You can get that effect with a standard clear oil or varnish – over time, it will turn a deeper orange/gold, and even an unpleasant brown. Your pine floor can be refinished by sanding off the old finish and replacing it with a product that will not change colour over time. 

Ready to Transform Your Floors?